Results tagged “opposite”

April 13, 2016 11:10 AM

Has Verizon Pulled a "Costanza?"

One of my favorite episodes of the TV comedy series "Seinfeld" is called "The Opposite," in which George Costanza reflects on his life, and realizes it is the opposite of what he hoped it would be.  At the diner, George tells his friends "that every decision I've ever made, in my entire life, has been wrong."  His best friend, Jerry, suggests "[i]f every instinct you have is wrong, then the opposite would have to be right."  (quotes from IMDB, episode 5.21)  By the end of the episode, after consistently "doing the opposite" of what he would normally do, George's life has corrected itself: he is dating a beautiful woman, has his dream job with the New York Yankees, and is able to move out of his parents' house. 


                                       Verizon Training Video

The episode starts with the universal human emotion of regret, and then humorously illustrates common logical fallacies, which are presented as both problem ("every decision I've ever made has been wrong") and solution ("the opposite would have to be right").  And, even though both problem and solution are products of fallacious reasoning . . . hijinks ensue--and problems resolve.  But, certainly, no one would actually take this seriously--especially not one of the largest companies in the country--would they?  

If its Public Policy Blog is reflective of its corporate mindset, Verizon--based on a couple of recent posts--appears to be willing to give George's zany solution a try.  But, are they really "doing the opposite," or have they just changed--as competition forces all firms to do?

A Net-Neutrality Flip?

First, on March 21st, Verizon in the context of net neutrality decides to "make clear what Verizon stands for and what kind of policies we support, regardless of the outcome of [the pending Open Internet Order appeal]."  And, as it turns out, the rules/policies that Verizon thinks "are fair, even-handed, good for consumers and essential for us and others to thrive going forward" . . . are pretty much the same rules the Commission adopted in its first Open Internet Order in 2010.  In other words, Verizon now endorses the very rules that were vacated as the result of the D.C. Circuit's decision in . . . Verizon v. FCC.    

Clearly, Verizon was seized with regret over an appeal it now realizes it could have lived with, but traded for worse rules, and is now "doing the opposite," right?  At first glance, it would seem to be the case, but, the blog is quick to explain that this is not a simple case of human regret (or any other human emotion) finding its way into Verizon's corporate offices.  

Rather, according to Verizon, it is not the same company it was five years ago, when it appealed the FCC's 2010 Open Internet Order.  In the intervening time period, Verizon notes, it has "invested billions in businesses that depend on the ability to reach customers over the networks and platforms of others."  Indeed, since 2013, Verizon has built its Digital Media, content and ad delivery, business through the acquisitions of EdgeCast, upLynk, Intel's OnCue ad delivery platform, and AOL.  

Thus, Verizon's net neutrality position is not really an example of it doing "the opposite" (though, of course, it would have saved itself and everyone else a lot of hassle and expense had it just recognized this before it appealed the 2010 Open Internet Order).  But this isn't Verizon's only, or even best, example of "doing the opposite" in the last month alone.

Verizon's Special Access "Compromise"

Last week Verizon decided to "up" the "opposite," and suggested--along with Chip Pickering, head of INCOMPAS (the rival carrier association formerly known as CompTel)--that the FCC should probably go ahead and regulate "new networks" along with the old special access circuits still subject to FCC regulation.  Verizon has long fought against any regulation of its data transmission services and has already received FCC forbearance and been selling its packet, Ethernet, and SONET optical services without regulation for almost 10 years, so this is a clear Costanza-esque flip-flop, right?

Let's take a closer look at the letter that Verizon and INCOMPAS jointly sent the FCC.  The letter asks the FCC to: 1) immediately, make all dedicated services--regardless of technology--"subject to Title II of the Communications Act, including Sections 201 and 202;" 2) seek comment on a permanent regulatory framework, which would include ex ante price regulation in "relevant markets" where competition is "insufficient."

When looking at whether Verizon is really "doing the opposite," it helps to keep in mind the "not the same Verizon" caveat.  In addition to Verizon's recent digital media investments, the company has been divesting itself of its wireline (telephone + ISP + TV) properties for years, and at an accelerating pace in the wake of the FCC's reclassification of Internet access services.  Similarly, based on Verizon's pending XO Communications acquisition, and its reported interest in Yahoo!, Verizon may well see INCOMPAS as more of a future trade association, and less of a regulatory opponent, these days.  

Until the terms "relevant market" and "insufficient competition" are defined, it's difficult to say how much of Verizon's future revenues are likely to be affected.  Given the Chairman's immediate endorsement of the "compromise," it's doubtful that Verizon is worried about having too much of its future revenues tied up by the regulation it's endorsing.  On the other hand, if you are a cable company--or a telecom carrier with some unique routes--Verizon's "compromise" seems more like the good, old-fashioned, Washington-style compromise . . . of someone else's opportunities.   

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In his more lucid, less politically-driven, first days on the job, Chairman Wheeler noted that every previous "network revolution" changed the world dramatically, and counseled that "we should not, therefore, be surprised when today's network revolution hurls new realities at us with an ever-increasing velocity."  When the velocity of new realities forces a rational economic actor to change positions as dramatically as a TV sitcom actor, it's safe to assume that the industry forcing those new realities is not subject to anything but competitive market forces.  So, why is it so hard for Chairman Wheeler to accept that the last thing a dynamically evolving "revolution" needs is more regulation?