Results tagged “TV”

March 17, 2016 4:48 PM

FCC Chairman Wheeler's Privacy Shell Game

In the past week, Chairman Wheeler has become the pied piper of the tech press.  He's been fawningly referred to as "the Dragonslayer," and, "the broadband industry's worst nightmare" (an encomium previously reserved for Comcast).  

Starting with a Huffington Post editorial entitled, "It's Your Data: Empowering Consumers to Protect Online Privacy," the Chairman has spawned copy that would draw an immediate FTC fine if it were attached to a product instead of a policy.  For example, NPR's headline, says the Chairman's proposed Internet privacy rules are going to "Let Consumers Set the Cost of Internet Privacy." New York Magazine's headline went further, saying  "The FCC Wants to Let Us Choose How Much the Internet Knows About Us."  

Unfortunately for Internet users, the reality is that--on the Internet--privacy is binary; you either have it, or you don't.  Moreover, as the Erin Andrews case demonstrates, on the Internet, when your information is lost to one person, it's available to everyone.  What is most concerning is not that the Chairman's proposed ISP privacy rules can't deliver on these fantastic promises, but that in the Chairman's Set Top Box NPRM, consumers are actually losing privacy that they used to have.   

Your Information Is Already on the Internet

It's no secret that, "your information is the commodity that drives the internet economy."  Nor is it any secret that this is the price the largest "free" websites/services charge for their services--such as those provided by Apple, Google, Facebook, and Microsoft.  

Likewise, Google is the leading online advertiser because it knows the most about you--and, according to the NY Times it is only getting better at gathering your information.  If you're interested, and have a Google account, here's an article with some links that allow you to see how much Google knows about you, based on your self-identified use of its apps.  But, these links don't tell you how much "pretty close to personal" data Google has collected on you, or what it has acquired through your use of its Android mobile operating system and mobile apps--which now account for 60% of mobile devices in the U.S.

The firms mentioned above are just the ones that you know have your information.  There is a whole industry comprised of firms, the names of which most people wouldn't recognize, called "data brokers."  These data brokers also track your Internet usage--and combine that information with other, personal information that they buy from your online merchants--to form a pretty accurate personal profile of all your online activity, which they make available to anyone willing to pay. 

ISP Privacy Rules Won't Give You "More" Privacy

Not surprisingly, according to experts, your ISP doesn't have any information about you that isn't already available from multiple other sources.  In fact, Professor Peter Swire of Georgia Tech says that, due to consumers' increased use of encryption, multiple connected devices, and proxy services, like VPNs, your ISP may actually know less about your Internet behavior than the websites you visit.

Of course, every expert doesn't agree completely with Prof. Swire's conclusions. In a thorough article presenting the opposing side, Computerworld reports that some experts disagree with Prof. Swire about how much of a consumer's Internet traffic ISPs can see--because encryption isn't always as effective as consumers might think, and even VPNs/DNS proxy services can be configured poorly.   Thus, Computerworld counsels readers to assume the worst, and that, "[m]uch like Google, your ISP knows everything about you."


                Now you all know everything about me . . .

Said differently, "the Internet" will not know one less fact about me if my ISP stops being the nth company to tell advertisers that I'm the leading YouTube viewer of "Lancelot Link: Secret Chimp" videos.  Rather, as Roslyn Layton explains, the effect of the proposed rules will be confined mostly to the ISPs, who must rely on consumers to pay an even larger share of the network costs, and the online advertising market--which needs more competition, not less. But, as for me, I get no "more" privacy than I have now.

Set Top Boxes Aren't Cheaper If You Pay with Your Privacy

Almost 30 years ago, during the politically polarized Senate confirmation hearings on President Reagan's Supreme Court nominee--Judge Robert Bork--some of the Judge's opponents were able to obtain his video rental history from his video store.  His opponents didn't find anything embarrassing, but they sparked a bi-partisan public outcry for laws to protect citizens from this type of repulsive invasion of privacy. Here's a contemporary article from the Chicago Tribune.   

Congress, though, was in front of the public this time, and Judge Bork's enemies could not have obtained his TV viewing records (if he was even a cable subscriber at the time), because in 1984 Congress had passed the Cable Communications Policy Act, protecting video subscribers' privacy. 47 U.S.C. 631   Since then, the FCC has had rules in place preventing the disclosure of personally-identifiable viewer information to third parties. 

In its Set Top Box NPRM, the Commission asserts that it will not totally ignore the requirements of the law, but the proposed rules would require the regulated entity (your cable or satellite MVPD) to send your personally-identifiable information to an unregulated third party providing a video navigation service.  The Commission suggests just asking Google and the data brokers to "self-certify" that they are complying with the legal obligations that apply to cable/satellite companies. See, NPRM at paras 73-74, 78.

Putting aside the dubious legality of the FCC's proposal, the Commission is exhibiting an almost-willful disregard for the purpose of the statute--or even worse, the importance of television as a shared medium.  The very nature of specific, viewer-tracked, ad delivery--of the kind Google proposes--is invasive.  Unless everyone gets the ad for [insert embarrassing product], then only the consumer gets embarrassed--when his friends watching March Madness ask, "why do I only see this ad at your house?"  

The Commission is expected to initiate an NPRM at its March 31st Open Meeting, for the purpose of ensuring that "consumers know what they are agreeing to when they sign up for Internet service."  There is nothing wrong with this goal.  In fact, it sounds a lot like the 32 year old law requiring TV providers to tell consumers the "nature of personally identifiable information collected or to be collected with respect to the subscriber and the nature of the use of such information."  Let's hope the data brokers are OK with that . . .

March 15, 2016 10:07 AM

What's Good for Google . . . Is Good for the FCC

More than a year before the Chairman's "unlock the box" initiative, the Chairman had a different idea:  if the FCC made it easier to become an over-the-top ("OTT") multi-channel video programming distributor ("MVPD"), then more companies would enter the market, and this competition would benefit all subscription video consumers.  You might think this would appeal to a new entrant with TV ambitions, like Google.

After all, the subscription TV market is devilishly hard to penetrate even if you can get the capital to build a distribution system.  A year ago, Google had 20,000 customers in Kansas City--after 5 years of trying.  But, Google wasn't in love with the Chairman's idea.  Why not?

The Market Is Internet Advertising . . . on TV Screens

Google is the dominant company in Internet advertising because it sells information about you--that it learns from your use of its applications, and devices--to advertisers.   If you're using the Internet, whether on a computer, mobile phone, or tablet, then there's a 70-85% likelihood that you're looking at Google ads (according this WSJ article re: the FTC Bureau of Competition 2012 staff recommendation on Google's abuse of its market power in online advertising). 

When you watch TV, however, the ads you see are not targeted at you personally, because they haven't been placed by Google.  This is something Google has been trying to fix since shortly after it first announced plans to build a fiber network.  Google, through its Google TV, and then Android TV, project makes "smart TVs" (with Google software built into the TV) and "buddy boxes" (set top boxes that work with a cable box/cable remote) available to consumers.  But none of these efforts have been particularly successful--leading industry observers to conclude that Google needed "another path to the TV screen."  

Then, a year ago, Google decided to try an "experiment" in Kansas City in which it combined its TV customers' content, and viewing history, with its advertising algorithms in order to sell targeted ads on the customers' TV screens.  Most likely, Google discovered that the content itself was the secret ingredient that would allow it to integrate the TV screen into its advertising universe.  

So why not become an OTT MVPD in the proceeding that Chairman Wheeler had initiated in December of 2014?  One obvious problem with this strategy is that MVPDs have long been subject to extremely strict FCC rules about disclosing customers' personally-identifiable information--rules that don't apply to edge providers like Google. The other problem with this approach is that the subscription TV market is devilishly hard to penetrate--just to get access to the customer's video content. Thus, shortly after Google announced its Kansas City TV experiment, it (along with several of its Google TV partners, trade associations, and pressure groups) formed the Consumer Video Choice Coalition ("CVCC") and began lobbying the Commission on a new set of issues.

The FCC Unbundles Video to Create "Device Market" Competition?

On February 18th, after 6 months of intensive lobbying by the CVCC, the FCC voted to require multichannel video programming distributors (hereinafter "MVPDs") to, effectively, "unbundle" the video stream going to and from the customer's television.  See, "Set Top Box NPRM".   The Commission explains that its proposed rules requiring video stream unbundling are necessary "because MVPDs offer products that directly compete with navigation devices and therefore have an incentive to withhold permission or constrain innovation, which would frustrate Section 629's goal of assuring a commercial market for navigation devices." Set Top Box NPRM at para 12. 

The FCC seems to believe that if it can imply that the MVPDs were responsible for the failure of the Commission's CableCARD rules, and that the MVPDs would likely frustrate any future rules to facilitate device interoperability, then it will be justified in implementing full-scale video stream unbundling.  So, on the thinnest of grounds--a couple of anecdotes, and a facially absurd theory--the FCC asserts that that MVPDs "offered poor support" for the CableCARD rules, and have the ability and incentive to frustrate the manufacture/sale of navigation devices by third parties. Set Top Box NPRM at paras 7, 12, and 28. The actual answer to the Commission's question was already available--but it wasn't the right answer.

The Commission's theory regarding MVPD's "incentive and ability" to foreclose third party sales of navigation devices has been litigated through trial in two separate consumer class action antitrust cases, and this theory has never been found to be supported by any evidence.  See, Jarrett v. Insight Communications Co., (W.D. Ky. July 14, 2014)  
 and Healy v. Cox Enterprises (W.D. Ok. Dec. 15, 2015).  If you bother to read either of these cases, you may also be surprised to learn that the device manufacturing market is very competitive--with at least 5 major vendors competing for each cable system.

So, as was the case with the Commission's reclassification of broadband Internet access, a very small number of privileged entities (Google, its partners and pressure groups) benefit from rules designed to address conduct that is not even hypothetically rational--much less, likely.   Still, you might think, who cares if the TV providers now have to compete with Google to sell ads to viewers?  But, Google won't be competing with your TV provider.

Don't Expect Much New Competition in the Device, or Online Advertising, Markets

One of the issues from the Commission's Net Neutrality Order (currently on appeal) is whether the FCC could, as part of reclassifying broadband Internet access as a "telecommunications service," classify all of an Internet user's formerly non-confidential information (the kind Google sells to advertisers) as "Customer Proprietary Network Information" ("CPNI") under Section 222 of the Act.  The statutory definition of CPNI is fairly broad, and includes information "made available to the carrier by the customer solely by virtue of the carrier-customer relationship." 47 USC 222(f)(1).  

If the DC Circuit agrees with the FCC that previously non-confidential customer data is now CPNI, as the result of the Commission's change in service definitions, then the FCC could limit the ability of ISPs to provide customer usage information to advertisers.  This was exactly the position that was being urged on the Commission by the Eric Schmidt/Google-funded pressure group New America, only a week before Chairman Wheeler put his "unlock the box" editorial on Recode.   

Last Wednesday, in a Senate Judiciary Committee Oversight Hearing, FTC chair, Edith Ramirez, was grilled on why the FTC overrode the recommendations of its Bureau of Competition and closed an investigation into Google's abuse of its market dominance in the online advertising market.  Not un-ironically, two days later, the FCC released a "fact sheet,"   describing its proposed rules to prevent ISPs from competing in that market by providing the same kind of ads that Google does--over your computer, mobile, and now, TV screens.