December 31, 2011 3:54 PM

The Year of "The Whale"

Well, here it is: New Year's Eve 2011, and--in case you haven't been reading along--over the past several months, I kind of took to calling Sprint "the Whale" in one of my blog posts based on their disproportionate (to their size in the market) influence in Washington (everything they do is "crazy big").  So when it came time to recognize a regulatory "player of the year", I have to give props where they're due, and congratulate the Whale.

Whether you like it or not, and whether by skill or luck, you have to give the Whale credit . . . of all the big telecom players/issues considered this year, the Whale pulled a clear-cut victory on their priority issue when AT&T and DT announced they were abandoning their deal to allow AT&T to acquire T-Mobile.  This doesn't happen much, and you have to recognize that this is no easy feat.  For this alone, 2011 was the year of the Whale, and 2012 will, by virtue of the Whale's win in 2011, by no means be the year of the consumer

Not taking anything away from Sprint's achievement, the coordinated actions of the DoJ and the FCC, did ensure that AT&T was never going to get an opportunity to defend itself on the merits in front of an impartial arbiter.  This is because, once it becomes clear that the regulator (which has much broader authority to deny the merger than that conferred on federal judges under Section 7 of the Clayton Act) has made up its mind to deny a merger, a court has a lot less incentive to even try an antitrust case. 

Consider that a U.S. District Court--under its Section 7 analysis--can only prevent the merger if it finds that it will lessen competition.  The FCC, on the other hand, seems free to ignore the analytical framework the court is bound by, and the FCC does not have to approve a merger unless the parties convincingly demonstrate that the merger "promotes" the public interest.  Thus, the FCC always holds the final cards. 

In cases like the DoJ/AT&T case--where DoJ seeks a permanent injunction (equitable relief that requires a longer trial/discovery period than traditional "extraordinary" merger relief, such as preliminary injunctions and temporary restraining orders, courts might well be much more likely to include the regulator in the process early, so as to avoid "wasting time."  Unfortunately, administrative/judicial efficiency can come at the cost of the merging parties' due process rights.

So, Congratulations! are in order for Sprint this New Year's Eve, and, looking forward, I would say that the way the "2 layer" merger review process (Justice/FTC + Regulatory Agency review) was exploited this year by the Agency, will possibly tee up this issue for legislative elimination in 2012. 

Happy New Years! to all my readers.  Thanks for taking the time to read my blog--I'm grateful for every "unique" view that I get--so tell all your friends!  Best wishes to all for a safe and successful 2012!

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